Exploring Wooden iPod Docks / by Daniel Buckley

The graduate thesis process is an excellent time to explore projects and hobbies in order to distract you from pursuing your actual thesis work. One of the activities I enjoyed  during breaks from thesis writing was working in the wood shop. When it came to deciding on a project, I decided to tackle a frustration of mine - I am constantly listening to music while I work, however the speakers on the iPhone are not that loud, and many of the public spaces where I was installing work didn't have outlets. So I decided to explore how to create iPod docks that not only didn't require electricity, but that I could also build out of cheap scrap material. The result was my series of wooden iPod Docks.

This model was the first on which I used a stain on the natural wood, versus paint it.

This model was the first on which I used a stain on the natural wood, versus paint it.

This model aimed to increase the volume of the wooden docks by using a cone-shaped funnel at the end.

This model aimed to increase the volume of the wooden docks by using a cone-shaped funnel at the end.

This version was meant to mimic the boom box form. Although the speaker on the iPhone/iPod is mono, I used a triangular form to split the sound and redirect it to the two speaker holes on the front facade.

This version was meant to mimic the boom box form. Although the speaker on the iPhone/iPod is mono, I used a triangular form to split the sound and redirect it to the two speaker holes on the front facade.

This early version was a gift for artist Fish McGill. My attempt with the painting was to recreate Fish's drawing style.

This early version was a gift for artist Fish McGill. My attempt with the painting was to recreate Fish's drawing style.